Orders, Decorations, Medals and Militaria (28 February & 1 March 2018)

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Date of Auction: 28th February & 1st March 2018

Sold for £3,400

Estimate: £1,200 - £1,500

A fine C.I.E., K.P.M. for Gallantry and Indian Police Medal group of seven awarded to Deputy Inspector-General of Police Hugh Keene, Madras Police

The Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, C.I.E., Companion’s 3rd type neck badge, gold and enamels, complete with neck cravat in its Garrard & Co. case of issue; King’s Police Medal, G.V.R., 1st issue, with gallantry ribbon (Asst. Supt. Hugh Keene, Indian Police); Indian Police Medal, G.VI.R., for Distinguished Conduct (Hugh Keene, Indian Police, District Superintendent of Police, Madras); British War Medal (2. Lieut. H. Keene.); India Service Medal 1939-45; Jubilee 1935; Coronation 1937, the last six mounted as worn, good very fine (7) £1200-1500

Footnote

C.I.E. London Gazette 12 June 1947: ‘Hugh Keene, Esq., Indian Police, Deputy Inspector-General of Police, Madras.’

K.P.M. London Gazette 1 January 1924. The recommendation states:

‘Hugh Keene, Assistant Superintendent of Police. This officer was taken for duty in the Agency rebellion from its commencement, and served in the operations for some seven months. During this period he was subjected to extraordinary physical exertion, having to perform constant arduous and forced marches under the most trying conditions of climate and country. Throughout this long period he showed great powers of endurance and was always ready to respond to any call with cheerful alacrity. He took part in the night action fought on the 6th December 1922 under Mr. Sweeny’s command, in which he behaved with great gallantry.’

Indian Police Medal Fort St. George Gazette 24 January 1939:

‘Hugh Keene, Indian Police, District Superintendent of Police. This officer joined the Police Force in Madras on 7th October 1920, after active service during the War. Since his arrival he has shown special aptitude for police work and as a Probationary Assistant Superintendent quickly came to notice. Before he completed one year’s service, he was selected for Special Duty in Madras City in connection with the prolonged mill strikes in the year of 1821 which led to serious disturbances calling for great devotion to duty on the part of officers concerned. At this time he received high commendation for his work. In 1922 he was taken for duty in the Agency Rebellion from its commencement, and served in operations for some seven months. During this period he exhibited great physical endurance, having to perform constant, forced marches under trying conditions of climate and country. Throughout this period he was always ready to respond with alacrity to any call. He took a leading part in the night action fought on the 6th December 1922 in which he behaved with conspicuous courage and leadership. For this he was awarded the King’s Police Medal for gallantry. He became a District Superintendent of Police in 1928 and since then has held charge of various heavy districts which he has administered with more than usual ability. He was also Commandant of the Malabar Special Police and he did much to found the efficiency of that body. In November 1935, he took charge of his present post of Assistant Inspector-General, where, with one brief spell of leave, he has since displayed ability of a very high order. During this period he has had to cope with large schemes such as the reorganisation of portions of the Madras City Police, Strike schemes, General Election Police arrangements throughout the Presidency, re-allocation of many parts of the Police jurisdiction, introduction of the Motor Vehicles Act, all arrangements for His Excellency the Viceroy’s visit to this Presidency this year, and many other big schemes involving meticulous devotion to detail and considerable research work.’