The Baird Jewels and Archive (19 September 2003)

Sorry, there are no images available for this lot

Date of Auction: 19th September 2003

Sold for £40,000

Estimate: £40,000 - £50,000

The nationally important “Baird Archive”, comprising “A Selection from the Original Letters of General Sir David Baird’s Correspondence”

Four volumes, containing a total of 178 manuscripts (see below), covering respectively: India and Seringapatam 1799-1801; Egypt 1801-02; The Cape 1805-07 and from Corunna until his death in 1829 £40,000-50,000

Footnote

This remarkable archive constitutes one of the most significant manuscript collections relating to the establishment of the British Empire - and arguably the English-speaking world - to have remained in private hands. As the note by Baird’s descendant (quoted below) makes clear, it represents part of his papers only, others being held in the collection of the National War Museum of Scotland, Edinburgh; but fortunately very little that has been preserved here can be described as insignificant: it is a collection of highlights, as dramatic as the story of the career they chronicle. It covers, often in great detail and with great vividness, the four major episodes - early imprisonment apart - of Baird’s career: the storming of Seringapatam, the taking of the Cape of Good Hope (and the disastrous South American adventure that followed it), the Egyptian campaign and the remarkable desert march, and - in the greatest detail of all - the Corunna campaign. The appearance of these four components would in itself be a major event. There are present, for example, the actual order that set in motion the storming of Seringapatam (see 11); the letter signed by the Commander of Cape Castle seeking a truce (see 97), surely a landmark in South African history; and no less than 26 autographed letters by Sir John Moore. Attention should also be drawn to the remarkable group of letters by Baird’s great rival, the young Colonel Wellesley, later Duke of Wellington, not least the generous tribute paid in letter no. 41.

Despite the statement to the contrary by Baird’s descendant (quoted below), the papers in this archive are by and large in excellent condition. Any defects are noted. Much, but by no means all, was published, in edited form as was conventional at the time, by Theodore Hook in his classic
Life, published in 1833, references to which are provided below. In listing the letters, we have followed the numbering of the volumes themselves.

THE CONTENTS


Volume I

Preliminary material:

Typed title-page: “A Selection from the Original Letters of General Sir David Baird’s Correspondence in four volumes:

. 1799-1801 Volume I [India and Seringapatam]
. 1801-1802 Volume II [Egypt]
. 1805-1807 Volume III [the Cape]
. 1807-1828 Volume IV [Corunna]

Arranged and Bound by Douglas & Foulis in October, 1919”; inscribed: “These letters were found in the Cellar at Newbyth in 1919, where they had evidently been lying for many years, & consequently had suffered considerably from damp. These were selected from amongst others as being of the most interest, & were found in 1919. D. Baird”; followed by typed list of contents, items 1-178 (which we have followed in our listing of the MSS),
very few letters preserved here have been affected by damp: those that have been are noted below

1. Baird (Sir David) Autograph memorandum of his service, from his entry into the army at fifteen years of age in December 1772, up until his resignation from the Irish command in 1822, covering all the major events of his career, from his imprisonment by Hyder Ali onwards (“…In 1780 – in action with Hyder Ali he was severely wounded & taken Prisoner & was confined for nearly four year’s at Seringapatam…”), 7 pages, 4to, undated [but c.1822]

2. Commission as Ensign, signed by George III, vellum, cockled, 14 December 1772

3. Commission as Captain Lieutenant, signed by George III, vellum, cockled, 26 December 1777

4. Commission as Captain, signed by George III, vellum, cockled, 24 September 1778

5. Commission as Major, signed by George III, vellum, cockled, 25 June 1787

6. Commission as Lieutenant Colonel, signed by George III, vellum, cockled, 8 December 1790

7. Commission as Colonel, signed by George III, vellum, cockled, 21 August 1791

INDIA AND SERINGAPATAM

8. Baird (Sir David) Retained secretarial transcript of a letter to Lord Hobart, Governor of Madras, in which he declines to do the East India Company’s bidding in threatening the Rajah of Tanjore, annotated and docketed by Baird, 3 pages, Tanjore, 24 January 1796 [Hook I 117-8]

9. Close (Barry, Colonel, Adjutant General) Letter signed to Baird, written on the eve of the storming of Seringapatam: “You have been informed by the Commander in Chief that he proposes placing You in the Command of the Troops which are to assault the Fort of Seringapatam – A Statement of the Troops intended for this Service is by his desire inclosed – He wishes the whole to be lodged in the Trenches during this Night…”, 2 pages, 4to, very minor damp-staining, small tear, “Head Quarters – Camp before Seringapatam 3rd May 1799” [Hook I 183: Seringapatam was stormed the following day]

10. Baird (Sir David) Retained scribal copy of Baird’s official report on the action (12 below), the account breaking off soon after the discovery of the body of Tipu Sultan, 6 pages, folio

11. Close (Barry, Colonel, Adjutant General) Autograph letter signed to Baird, ordering the assault on Seringapatam: “To Major General Baird/ Commanding the Troops ordered for the Assault of Seringapatam/ Sir/ The Breach being reported practicable the Commander in Chief desires that the Assault may be made this day at 1, P.M./ I have the honor to be sir/ Your most obedt Servt By: Close/ Adjt Genl of the Army/ Head Quarters Camp/ 4th May 1799/ P.S. You are requested to shew this order to Major General Popham Senior Officer in the Trenches/ B:C”, 1 page, 4to, Head Quarters, 4 May 1799 [Hook I 186-7]

12. Baird (Sir David) Letter signed, to the Commander-in-Chief, Lieutenant-General Harris, being his official despatch describing the storming of Seringapatam, describing preparations, the assault itself and discovery of Tipu Sultan’s body (“…under a Slaughtered heap of several hundreds, many of whom were Men of consequence in his Service, had the Pleasure to Discover the Body of the Sultaun. He had been Shot through the Head and Body, and was quite Dead; I caused him to be immediately put into a Palanquin and conveyed to the Palace…”), with one authorial revision to the text, 8 pages, 4to, later pagination (seemingly by Baird) from B.28 to 35, small-damp stain and consequent wear in inner margin, with no loss of text, “Camp Seringapatam 6th May 1799” [Hook I 207-12]

13. Baird (Sir David) Later transcript, docketed by Baird, of the letter originally accompanying his official report to General Harris (12 above), protesting at being superseded immediately after his victory by his junior, Colonel Wellesley, 5 pages, 4to, in wove paper, minor wear, “Camp Seringapatam/ 6th May 1799” [c.1820] [Hook I 213-6]

14. Baird (Sir David) Later transcript of his official report to General Harris of the storming of Seringapatam (12 above), 11 pages, 4to, on wove paper, “Camp Seringapatam/ 6 May 1799” [c.1820] [Hook I 207-12]

15. Sherbrooke (John Coape, Colonel) Letter signed, to Baird, presenting him with the Seringapatam Sword: “I am requested by the Field Officers who had the Honor of personally serving under you at the Storming of Seringapatam the 4th Ulto to inform you that they have ordered Jeffrey’s & Jones to make a Dress Sword Value 200 Guineas bearing the following inscription ‘Seringapatam taken by Storm 4th May 1799.’ On the one side, and on the other ‘Presented by the Field Officers who personally served under Major General Baird on that occasion.’ Which they beg you will do them the honor of accepting as a mark of their esteem and of their admiration of your personal exertions on that day…”, 1 page, 4to, minor spotting, “Camp 4th June 1799” [Hook I 221-2]

EGYPT

16. Translations of letters by the Sultan of Aden, docketed “Translations of letters from the Sultaun of Aden to the Government of Bombay…”, swearing friendship, 10 pages, folio, paper watermarked 1799

17. Authorised copy, certified by the Government Secretary, of a letter by Brigadier General Koehler, to Wellesley, reporting on French forces in Egypt, 7 pages, folio, paper watermarked 1799, Jaffa, 9 July 1800

18. Authorised copy, certified by the Government Secretary, of a letter by Marquess Wellesley “To The First Vizier to the Shereef of Mecca” and others, expressing satisfaction that they are “fully aware of the danger with which the whole of the Arabian Territory is menaced by the establishment of the French in Egypt”, 3 pages, folio, paper watermarked 1800

19. Transcript of the “Secret” letter by Secretary Dundas, to the Admiralty Board, setting in foot [Baird’s] expedition to Egypt in order to oust the remnants of Bonaparte’s army there, 13 pages, folio, paper watermarked 1798, spotted by damp, Downing Street, 6 October 1800 [Hook I 245-8]

20. Transcript of the despatch by Dundas to Marquess Wellesley, forwarding his letter to the Admiralty Board (19 above), 7 pages, folio, spotted by damp, Downing Street, 6 October 1800

21. Transcript of a letter from Rear Admiral Blankett, to Marquess Wellesley, giving intelligence and advice on the forthcoming expedition, 5 pages, folio, paper watermarked 1799, “Bombay 23d November 1800”

22. Authorised copy, certified by the Government Secretary, of a letter by Lord Elgin to Marquess Wellesley, about the proposed expedition, 2 pages, folio, Constantinople, 17 December 1800

23. Wellesley (Richard, Marquess, Governor General) “Private and Secret” letter signed, to Baird, instructing him with regard to his appointment as Lieutenant Governor of Batavia [immediately prior to his appointment to the Egyptian command], 2 pages, folio, Fort William, 5 February 1801

24. Wellesley (Richard, Marquess, Governor General) Letter signed, to Baird, Colonel Champagne, and Richard Conyers Birch, setting out the duties of the administration of Batavia, countersigned by the Governor General’s Chief Secretary, 8 pages, folio, Fort William, 5 February 1801

25. Wellesley (Richard, Marquess, Governor General) “Most Secret” letter signed, to Baird, giving instructions regarding negotiations with the present government of Batavia, countersigned by the Governor General’s Secretary, 3 pages, folio, Fort William, 5 February 1801

26. Wellesley (Richard, Marquess, Governor General) “Private and most Secret” letter signed, to Baird, alerting him to a change in plan, 2 pages, 4to, very light spotting, Fort William, 6 February 1801 [Hook I 242-3]

27. Authorised copy, attested by the Government Assistant Secretary, of Wellesley’s “Secret” letter to his brother Arthur Wellesley [afterwards Duke of Wellington], informing him that the Batavian expedition under Baird is being sent instead to the Red Sea, and that he is to be second in command, noting that a copy of the letter is being sent to Baird, 3 pages, folio, very slightly spotted, Fort William, 10 February 1801 [Hook I 249]

28. Authorised copy of a letter by G.H. Barlow, Chief Secretary to the Government, attested by the Government Assistant Secretary, to Charles Stokes, instructing him to accompany Baird’s expedition and to supervise supplies, noting that a copy of the letter is being sent to Baird, 8 pages, folio, Fort William, 10 February 1801

29. Wellesley (Richard, Marquess, Governor General) Letter signed, to Baird, accompanying the copy of the letter to Stokes (28 above): “Mr Stokes has suggested to me the expediency of opening an intercourse between Mocha and the opposite Coast of Africa for the purpose of establishing a supply of fresh cattle to the troops under your command…”, 4 pages, folio, Fort William, 19 February 1801

30. Authorised extract, attested by the Governor General’s Secretary, “from the Most Noble the Governor General to Sir Roger Curtis”, concerning the forthcoming expedition to the Red Sea, 5 pages, folio, minor stains, 1 March 1801

31. Transcript of a secret letter by the Governor in Council at Bombay to the Governor in Council at Madras, concerning the forthcoming expedition, 2 pages, folio, paper watermarked 1799, Fort St George, 3 March 1801

32. Wellesley (Richard, Marquess) “Secret” letter signed, to Baird, instructing him that the detachment of horse artillery serving with him should remain under the immediate command of Captain Clement Brown, 3 page, folio, seal-stain, Fort William, 7 March 1801

33. Wellesley (Richard, Marquess, Governor General) Letter signed, to Baird, being his instructions with regard to his conduct towards the Arab states: “As it is of material importance to conciliate to our Interests the principal Arab Powers occupying the Shores of the Red Sea, and induce them to make a common cause with us against the French…”, 6 pages, folio, small [?] scorch mark, affecting a few words, Fort William, 18 March 1801

34. Transcript of a letter by Lord Hobart to General Fox, concerning native Indian troops serving on Baird’s Red Sea expedition, 4 pages, folio

Volume II

35. Wellesley (Richard, Marquess, Governor General) Letter signed, to Baird, forwarding a report by Lord Elgin on French forces in Egypt, 2 pages, folio, Fort William, 19 March 1801

36 . Authorised copy, certified by the Government Secretary, of a letter [by Marquess Wellesley] headed “To the Shereef of Mecca Imaum of Senna Sultaun of Aden”, assuring them of the friendly intentions of Baird’s expedition, 10 pages, folio, 19 March 1801 [Hook I 273-6]

37. Duplicate signed by Sir Roger Curtis, Governor of the Cape, attested at the head “Copy R.C.”, of a letter to Vice Admiral Rainier, Major General Baird and Colonel Wellesley, concerning the Batavian expedition, 14 pages, folio, small tear to one leaf, Cape of Good Hope, 20 March 1801

38. Wellesley (Richard, Marquess, Governor General) Letter signed and marked by Wellesley “Secret”, to Baird, discussing the forthcoming expedition and evidently forwarding some of the attested copies (listed above), 7 pages, folio, minor green damp-stain, Fort William, March 1801

39. Authorised extract, attested as a true prototype, from a letter by Jonathan Duncan, Governor of Bombay, to Mehedi Ali Khan, Native Commissioner, Red Sea, to be delivered by Baird, and expressing his confidence in his conduct, 2 pages, folio, 5 April 1801

40. Wellesley (Arthur, Colonel, afterwards Duke of Wellington) Autograph copy of “a letter from Colonel Wellesley to Sir Ralph Abercromby dated Bombay April 6th 1801”, giving a detailed account of the forces under Baird’s command and the aims of the expedition (sent with Wellesley’s letter to Baird, see 41 below), 7 pages, folio, Bombay, 6 April 1801 [Hook I 316-22]

41. Wellesley (Arthur, Colonel, afterwards Duke of Wellington) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, a remarkable letter, written after ill-health had prevented him accompanying Baird to the Red Sea as his second-in-command (“…As I am writing upon this subject I will freely acknowledge that my regret at being prevented from accompanying you has been greatly increased by the kind candid, & handsome manner in which you have behaved towards me; & I will confess as freely not only that I did not expect such treatment, but that my wishes before you arrived regarding going upon the expedition were directly the reverse of what they are at this moment. I need not enter farther into this subject than to intreat that you will not attribute my stay to any motive than that to which I have above assigned it; & to inform you that as I know what has been said & expected by the world in general, I propose as well for my own credit, as for your’s to make known to my friends & your’s, not only the distinguished manner in which you have behaved towards me, but the causes which have prevented me from demonstrating my gratitude by giving you every assistance in the arduous service which you have to conduct…”), and enclosing his memorandum on the expedition (40 above), 5 pages, 4to, Bombay, 9 April 1801 [Hook I 314-6]

42. Wellesley (Arthur, Colonel, afterwards Duke of Wellington) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, describing the progress of his health, and the measures that he has taken to supply Baird’s expedition with water, having heard “melancholy accounts of the want of water in the Red Sea”, 3 pages, 4to, Bombay, 11 April 1801 [not in Hook]

43. Transcripts of two letters by General Hutchinson, to Admiral Blankett, expressing his “most grievous disappointment” at the non-arrival of Baird, and the threat posed by the French to Alexandra, 4 pages, folio

44. Official translation, sealed, of a letter by “Son Altesse Le Hussaein Capitan Pacha &c &c &c &c &c &c”, to Baird (“A Son tres cher, et Estimable ami Le General Berred, Commandant en Chef, des troupes Brittaniques a Koussair”), welcoming him to Egypt and promising the Grand Vizier’s help with pack horses, 2 pages, folio, on English paper, 8 June 1801

45. Wellesley (Arthur, Colonel, afterwards Duke of Wellington) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, a long letter in which “I have thus my Dear General given you a history of affairs in this country which I hope will be interesting to you”, 15 pages, 4to, Seringapatam, 21 June 1801

46. Retained draft, in a secretarial hand with one authorial revision, docketed “Copy of Plan for the Movement of the Army – 24 June 1801”, outlining Baird’s plans for his epic march across the desert, beginning: “I have very attentively considered every mode, by which Water can be carried across the desert…”, 3 pages, folio, paper watermarked 1799, 24 June 1799 [Hook I 310-2]

47. Hutchinson (Sir John Hely, General) Letter signed, to Baird, beginning: “I have had the honor of receiving Several Letters from You of Various Dates, and am Sorry that You have experienced so many difficulties in passing the Desert – I cannot exactly Make out What Your Force is, as the Cypher You mention Colo Murray having Sent, has never reached Me…”, and sending him an account of the progress of the campaign so far (“…The French at Cairo have surrendered, and are to March out on the 10th of this Month to be Conveyed to France. Nothing now remains in this Country but the Garrison of Alexandria – Menou is entirely obstinate, and will never Surrender till driven to the last extremity, what the feelings of his Garrison possibly may be, are more doubtful; but according to all human probability we Must Besiege the Place…”), 8 pages, folio, docketed as a duplicate, small seal-tear, slightly spotted with damp, “Head Quarters Camp near Gizeh/ 5th July 1801” [cited but not quoted by Hook I 335]

48. Official return, in a scribal hand, of “Officers and Men proceeding on the Jehangeer to join their Stations in the Red Sea”, 1 page, oblong folio, Bombay, 10 July 1801

49. Popham (Sir Home, Admiral) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, written just before leaving Mocha for Calcutta, and updating him on the position as regards supplies, 3 pages, folio, Mocha, 19 July 1801

50. Copy of a letter by Colonel Montresor to Marquess Wellesley, sending news from Egypt during Baird’s crossing of the desert, 3 pages, 4to, on wove paper [c.1820], Kosseir, 24 July 1801

51. Original letter, from the Grand Vizier, in an envelope docketed “From the Grand Vizier – received Kenne 31 July 1801 – Answered E:D:”, stamped with the Grand Vizier’s seal, 1 page, folio

52. A letter in Arabic, sealed, possibly enclosed with 51 above, 1 page, folio

53. A letter in Arabic, sealed, possibly enclosed with 51 above, 1 page, folio

54. Hutchinson (Sir John Hely, General) Letter signed, to Baird, advising him on the best route for his march to join him before Alexandria, 3 pages, 4to, Head Quarters, Camp before Alexandria, 20 August 1801

55. Hutchinson (Sir John Hely, General) “Secret & confidential” letter signed, to Baird, announcing his return to England and outlining future depositions, and discussing the outbreak of plague at Rosetta (“…The early appearance of the Plague is a dreadful circumstance, I shall send over Mr Young to concert measures with you to morrow…”), 4 pages, folio, Head Quarters, 18 September 1801 [summarised Hook I 369-70]

56. Wellesley (Richard, Marquess, Governor General) Authorised copy with facsimile signature, certified by the Assistant Secretary, of a long despatch to Baird (a sent copy of 57 below), expressing approval of his conduct and ordering his army back to India, 10 pages, quarto, Patna, 15 October 1801 [summarised Hook II 37-42]

57. Wellesley (Richard, Marquess, Governor General) Duplicate letter signed, certified by the Senior Assistant Secretary (a duplicate of 56 above, headed “Original by [i.e. carried by] Sir Home Popham”), expressing approval of his conduct and ordering his army back to India (“…I received with particular pleasure the details of the activity, perseverance, military skill and judicious arrangements, which enabled the army under your command to surmount the difficulties, which opposed its march through the desert from Cosseir to Kinne…”), 18 pages, quarto, docketed as received at Alexandria 7 March 1802, Patna, 15 October 1801 [summarised Hook II 37-42]

58. Hutchinson (Sir John Hely, General) Revised English draft of Hutchinson’s letter of protest to the Grand Vizier, after his seizure of Marmeluke Beys under English protection (“…I supplicate God to pardon me my credulity, but I will not add to it the baseness of suffering you to enjoy the fruits of the your enormous crime…”), 3 pages, folio, [Alexandria, 27 October 1801] [Hook I 401-2]

59. Hutchinson (Sir John Hely, General) Letter signed, to Baird, ordering him to take possession of the Fort St Julien in consequence of the Grand Vizier’s act, 3 pages, 4to, Alexandria, 31 October [1801] [expurgated version Hook I 404-5]

60. Cavan (Richard William Lambart, Earl of, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, announcing that he has taken over command of the army from Hutchinson (“…Genl H has left me in a very unpleasant situation regarding these Marmulukes, his Letter to me concerning them is unsatisfactory, vague & in toto is nothing he mentions no other subject whatever…”), 1 page, folio, Alexandria, 6 November 1801

61. Cavan (Richard William Lambert, Earl of, General) Letter signed, to Baird, regarding the acceptance of gifts from Turks, 3 pages, folio, Alexandria, 6 November 1801 [summarised Hook II 2]

62. Cavan (Richard William Lambert, Earl of, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, written as commander-in-chief of the two newly-united armies (Baird having previously exercised independent command), and outlining policy regarding the seizure of the Beys (“…I do not think myself justified in going to War with the Turks…”), 3 pages, 4to, Alexandria, 7 November 1801 [extract Hook II 4-5]

63. Cavan (Richard William Lambert, Earl of, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, discussing further his policy regarding the Turks, 2 pages, 4to, Alexandria, 8 November 1801

64. Cavan (Richard William Lambert, Earl of, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, concerning his future and other matters (“…I did not feel Easy at the idea of your declining to act in any Military Command when the Two Armies were united, Your Letter of yesterday has entirely relieved me…”), 2 pages, folio, Alexandria, 9 November 1801 [long extract Hook II 7-8]

65. Cavan (Richard William Lambert, Earl of, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, concerning the Grand Vizier and other matters, 2 pages, folio, Alexandria, 17 November 1801

66. Retained copy of a letter by Baird to Lord Cavan (in the handwriting of Colonel Doran, see 75 below), regarding a court martial, 1 page, folio, Camp near El Hamed, 22 November 1801

67. Cavan (Richard William Lambert, Earl of, General) Letter signed and subscribed, to Baird, giving orders for the change is disposition of the army after the Peace of Amiens, 3 pages, folio, Alexandria, 30 November 1801 [Hook II 19-21]

68. Retained copy of Baird’s reply to Cavan (67 above), in Colonel Doran’s handwriting, tendering advice, 3 pages, folio, Camp near El Hamed, 1 December 1801 [long extract Hook II 21-2]

69. Cavan (Richard William Lambert, Earl of, General) Letter signed, to Baird, discussing the disposition of Baird’s troops, 3 pages, folio, Alexandria, 1 December 1801 [summarised Hook II 24-6]

70. Cavan (Richard William Lambert, Earl of, General) Letter signed and subscribed, to Baird, discussing pay for Baird’s troops with regard to the Indian allowance concerning the Indian allowance, and their disposition, 3 pages, folio, Alexandria, 3 December 1801 [summarised Hook II 24-6]

71. Cavan (Richard William Lambert, Earl of, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, ordering him to Alexandria, 3 pages, folio, Alexandria, 5 December 1801 [long extract Hook II 26]

72. Minute of a letter written on behalf of the Grand Vizier, avowing friendship towards the English, 1 page, folio, docketed by Baird, December 1801

73. Memorandum, docketed “Secret Information about the Nile/ 1801”, 13 pages, folio, 15 June 1801

74. Clarke (Sir Alured, General) Warrant signed, authorizing Baird, or other field officers commanding Company troops “to be Employed on a Search Expedition”, to hold courts martial, 3 pages, folio, papered seal, Calcutta, 5 February 180

75. “Proceedings of a Line Court Martial held by Order of Major General Baird Alexandria 8th Jany 1802”, sentencing one soldier to 300 and another to 250 lashes, each initialled as approved by Baird and counter-signed by William Doran, Lieutenant Colonel Major Dillon’s Regiment, as president, and marked in pencil with the full lashes received, 4 pages, folio, Alexandria, 8 January 1801

76. Authorised copy, certified as a true copy by the Government Secretary and examined by the Senior Assistant, of a letter by Marquess Wellesley, to Sir Home Popham, giving instruction on the handover of Egypt to Turkey under the terms of the Treaty of Amiens, 7 pages, folio, Lucknow, 8 February 1802

77. Authorised copy, certified as a true copy by the Government Secretary and examined by the Senior Assistant, of a letter by Marquess Wellesley, to General Hutchinson, concerning the return of Baird’s troops to India, 4 pages, folio, Lucknow, 8 February 1802

78. Cavan (Richard William Lambert, Earl of, General) Letter signed and subscribed, to Baird, regarding payment for barracks, 1 page, folio, Alexandria, 12 March 1802

79. Copy of an authorised copy of letters by Lord Hobart, Minister for War and Colonies, to Lord Cavan and General Fox at Malta, regarding the repatriation of Baird’s troops, 3 pages, folio, 18 March 1802 [Hook II 52-4]

80. Authorised copy, signed by the Government Secretary, of the proclamation issued to the people of Egypt on Baird’s first going into Egypt, 4 pages, folio, [undated but March 1801 and bound out of order]

81. Cavan (Richard William Lambert, Earl of, General) Letter signed and subscribed, to Baird, docketed by Colonel Doran, refusing to pay for his troops, 2 pages, folio, Alexandria, 18 April 1802

82. Authorised copy, certified by the Senior Assistant, of Lord Hobart’s letter to Marquess Wellesley, announcing the brilliant results of the Treaty of Amiens and congratulating him on the conduct of the Indian army in Egypt, 7 pages, folio, Downing Street, 1 May 1802

83. Copy of a letter by Lord Cavan, to the Officer Commanding HM Ships at Suez, preparing for Baird’s embarkation, 2 pages, folio, Alexandria, 3 May 1802

84. Autograph letter signed by Mousrer Mehmet, Pasha, Viceroy of Egypt, to Baird, expressing high approbation, 1 page, folio, Cairo, 15 May 1802

85. Autograph letter signed by Mousrer Mehmet, Pasha, Viceroy of Egypt, to Baird, thanking him for leaving armaments behind, and praising his army, 2 pages, 4to, Cairo, 18 May 1802 [extract Hook II 52-3]

86. Duplicate, signed by Adjutant General Auchmuchty, of Lord Cavan’s order putting into execution the sentence of death passed on two soldiers for desertion, 4 pages, folio, Alexandria, 15 May 1802

87. McGregor (James, Surgeon, afterwards Wellington’s Chief of Medical Staff), autograph report as Supervising Surgeon, to Baird, accompanying a return “of the mortality of the Army under your command” during the expedition (see 88 below), 3 pages, folio, Mocha Harbour, 15 June 1802

88. Return signed and subscribed by Surgeon McGregor of the “State of the Deaths and Diseases in the Indian Army in Egypt” (see 87 above), 1 page, 4to, [15 June 1802]

Volume III

THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE

89. Memorandum docketed by Baird “Ideas on the Mode of attacking the Cape”, in a secretarial hand with a few revisions and deletions, 5 pages, folio, paper watermarked 1804 [c.1805]

90. Castlereagh (Robert Stewart, Viscount, Secretary for War and Colonies) Letter signed, to Baird, marked “Most secret”, docketed “Instructions from the Secretary of State relative to the taking of the Cape of Good Hope”, confirming Baird’s command (“…His majesty has entrusted to you the Conduct of the Military part of this Service under a full confidence in your experience, Zeal, and discretion…”) and furnishing him with his orders (“…It is of the utmost Importance that the Object of this Expedition should not transpire – and lest the Enemy should be apprized of your Approach, the Troops at Cork have been directed to embark under your Command
for the Mediterranean. – The India Fleet has been ordered to proceed at once to India – both Fleets will sail with these ostensible Destinations, but having sealed Orders to be opened at a certain Latitude, directing them to rendezvous at the Madeiras, where the whole Naval and Military Force (including the Companys Ships) will be directed to place themselves under you Orders, and those of Sir Home Popham…”), 18 pages, folio (the inner bifolia bound in reverse order), Downing Street, 25 July 1805 [Hook II 79-83]

91. Castlereagh (Robert Stewart, Viscount, Secretary for War and Colonies) Letter signed, to Baird, headed by him “Most secret & separate”, with an addition in his hand, assessing the troops needed and promising extra light dragoons and a company of royal artillery (“…It is certainly your duty to bring under the Consideration of His Majesty’s Ministers the difficulties you may have to encounter, in the proposed Expedition…”), 2 pages, folio, address wrapper, Downing Street, 25 July 1805 [cited Hook II 85]

92. Frederick (HRH, Duke of York, Commander-in-Chief) Letter signed, to Baird, docketed “Instructions from H.R.H. The Duke of York relative to the raking of the Cape of Good Hope”, listing the corps waiting for Baird at Cork and the officers who will serve under him (with an addition in the Duke’s hand), and furnishing details of other forces that might be utilised (“…The services of the Hottentots having been found extremely useful during the period of that Colony being in our possession, I have, in concurrence with His Majesty’s Ministers to desire, that should you deem it expedient, you may be pleased to give them every encouragement to enter into His Majesty’s service…”), 7 pages, folio, Horse Guards, 26 July 1805

93. Castlereagh (Robert Stewart, Viscount, Secretary for War and Colonies) Letter signed, to Baird, marked “Most secret”, giving instructions “in case of failure in the Expedition against the Cape”, with an addition in Castlereagh’s hand, 3 pages, folio, address wrapper, Downing Street, 26 July 1805

94. Castlereagh (Robert Stewart, Viscount, Secretary for War and Colonies) Letter signed, to Baird, marked “Secret”, regarding his salary as Lieutenant Governor of the Cape, 1 page, folio, Downing Street, 26 July 1805

95. Hawkesbury (Robert Banks Jenkinson, Lord, later Earl of Liverpool, Home Secretary) Letter signed, to Baird, written in Castlereagh’s absence, ordering him to defer his departure until ordered, 1 page, folio, Downing Street, 31 July 1805

96. Hawkesbury (Robert Banks Jenkinson, Lord, later Earl of Liverpool, Home Secretary) Letter signed, to Baird. Marked “Most secret”, ordering him to set sail for Madeira, 1 page, folio, Downing Street, 5 August 1805

97. Letter signed by H.C.C. von Prophelow, Lieutenant Colonel commanding the Town and Castle, Cape Town, to Baird, in Afrikaans, sending the flag of truce: “To prevent the consequences which must ensue from the Town and Castle being defended; I hereby propose to you a Cessation of Arms for Forty Eight hours to enter into negotiations…”, 1 page, folio, Castle of Good Hope, 9 January 1806; together with the contemporary official translation by G. Nohne, “Horn Translator to Government”

98. Frederick (HRH, Duke of York, Commander-in-Chief) Letter signed, to Baird, recalling him from his command, 1 page, folio, Horse Guards, 22 July 1806

99-103. Copies of correspondence by Sir Home Popham with the commandant of the island of Gorretti and of his report of proceedings to the Admiralty; together with the covering letter to Baird, 8 pages, folio, HMS
Diadem, River Plate and Maldonado Roads, 30 October to 1 November 1806

104. Windham (William, Secretary for War and Colonies) Letter signed, to Baird, written in response to his dispatch announcing his taking of the Cape (“…I feel great Gratification in having it in my power to convey to you His Majestys Approbation of your Conduct in the course of that Service, as well as of the conduct of the Troops under your Command…”), 3 pages, folio, Downing Street, 1 March 1806 [Hook II 145-6]

105. Transcript docketed by Baird “Copy of Sir Home Pophams letter to the Senior Officer of the Navy at the Cape of Good Hope, requesting reinforcements” (sent with 106 below), 2 pages, folio, Buenos Ayres, 5 July 1806

106. Popham (Sir Home, Admiral) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, announcing the capture of Buenos Ayres, and requesting reinforcements, 4 pages, 4to, damp-stained, Buenos Ayres, [?] 6 July 1806

107-112. Copies of Sir Home Popham’s correspondence with the Admiralty, General Beresford, Baird, the Governor General of Monte Video, and others, during his South American campaign, 31 pages, folio, 25 August to 8 September 1806

113. Popham (Sir Home, Admiral) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, sending him copies of his correspondence (presumably 107-112 above), 2 pages, 4to, damp-stained, Maldonado, 15 November 1806

114. Popham (Sir Home, Admiral) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, a long letter written after the failure of his South American campaign, complaining at the ill treatment he has received at the hands of the new ministry (“…I shall soon meet you in London to talk over all these broils & ill usages…”), 17 pages, 4to, damp-stained, Maldonado, 17 November 1806 [extract Hook II 152-3]

115. Popham (Sir Home, Admiral) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, written after his recall (“…Here I am once more a private Gentleman in South America holding up my Head against the most arbitrary measures that ever disgraced the most vindictive & Tyrannical Minister. I am superceeded in the Command by Admiral Stirling, he has refused to give me a Ship to go to England in…”), 11 pages, 4to, Maldonado, 110 December 1806 [long extract Hook II 153-6]

116. Testimonial docketed “Address from the Inhabitants constituting The Publick Boards To Lt Genl Sir David Baird previous to his departure from the Cape” (“…by your wise and well directed measures for our Internal Government, together with the unparalleled Discipline of the Troops under your Excellency’s Command, our rights have been guarded, and the whole Colony enjoys at this moment a State of tranquillity and Plenty Seldom, if ever equalled…”), signed by some forty members of the Court of Justice, Burgher Senate, Orphan Chamber, Vestry of the Lutheran Church, Matrimonial Court, Chamber of the regulating of Insolvent Estates, and Lombard Bank, 8 pages, folio, [?] compositor’s fingerprints, Cape of Good Hope, [16] January 1809 [Hook II 157-8]

117. Testimonial signed by P.L. Cloete, to Baird, on his departure (“…instead of a Conqueror we have found in you a friend and benefactor…”), 3 pages, 4to, Cape Town, 17 January 1807

118. Testimonial signed by W.W. Reynevelt, Fiscal, to Baird, on his departure (“…no Governor of this Colony ever took away a larger portion of the good Wishes & thanks of the Inhabitants of every Class, than Your Excellency…”), 3 pages, 4to, Cape Town, 18 January 1806

CORUNNA

119 and 119 a-h. Baird (Sir David, General) Account of his service during the Corunna campaign, in a scribal hand, with autograph revisions, 47 pages, folio, undated [post 1820] [paraphrased in part by Hook II Chapter VII onwards]

Volume IV

120. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, written soon after Baird’s arrival at Corunna (the letter opening: “I need hardly say the satisfaction it afforded me, when I found that I was to have you for my Colleague, not only on account of your known character, and talents as an Officer, but as an old friend…”), stating his intention to join him at Corunna and thus unite the two armies, and giving detailed instructions for the ensuing campaign, 7 pages, folio, Lisbon, 12 October 1808 [extended extracts Hook II 186-9]

121. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, a follow-up to his letter of 12 October (120 above), 3 pages, 4to, Lisbon, 14 October 1808

122. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, giving instructions according with his letter of the 22nd (120 above) and commenting on their respective situations, 7 pages, folio, Lisbon, 22 October 1808 [Hook II 191-3 with omissions]

123. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, seemingly a shorter version of the preceding letter (122 above) but of a more private nature (‘…It does not surprise me that you should be without money or any thing else, for in England they seem always to be ignorant of what it most imports them to know…”), 3 pages, 4to, Lisbon, 22 October 1808

124. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, written the day before starting his march on Almeida, and giving detailed instructions to Baird prior to his march on Astorga, 7 pages, folio, Lisbon, 26 October 1808 [Hook II 197-200]

125. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, written after hearing that the French have received 27,000 reinforcements (“…a considerable alarm is excited, and it becomes particularly necessary that we should get together as soon as possible…”), causing him to give urgent instructions, 4 pages, folio, Ciudad Rodrigo, 11 November 1808 [Hook II 203-5]

126. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, expressing pleasure at his progress (“…I wish only we were once united and that our Commissariat knew how to feed us – and that the Spaniards were more firm & decided, for whilst we at Madrid they are wrangling, & all the Generals are separate & independent, we can look to nothing but disaster, if the French are once in sufficient force to move forward. However we must hope & do for the best…”), 3 pages, folio, Ciudad Rodrigo, 12 November 1808 [Hook II 207-8]

127. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, written after hearing that the French were advancing (“…The French have entered Burgos, and have driven from it part of the Estramadara Army, in what force they are, or whether their intention is to advance further, I know not. If they advance, whilst we are assembling, they will embarrass us. I do not understand the Movements of the Spanish Generals they are seperated without the possibility of aiding each other…leaving the whole country, in our front, whilst we are collecting, open to the Enemy…”), 8 pages, 4to, passages marked up in pencil by Hook for publication, Salamanca, 13 November 1808 [extracts Hook II 208-10]

128. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, written on receiving the dreaded news of the French entry into Valladolid and instructing Baird to look for himself and if necessary to fall back on Corunna (“…the event has happened, which I always saw was a possible one, but as it was the very worst which could befall us, I was in hopes our good fortune would have saved us from it. There is no help for it – we have done what we could to join, & be of use to this Nation, if we have not succeeded it is their fault, & not ours – we had a right to expect that they would have been able to cover us, until united…”), 4 pages, 4to, Salamanca, 15 November 1808 [Hook II 210-11]

129. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, ordering him to collect his forces at Astorga prior to retreating on Corunna should circumstances warrant (“…you must retire rather than Commit, in any degree, the safety of your Corps – it is when united that we can alone do good, not by fighting separately partial actions, if they can be avoided…”); at the end of the letter, he announces: “Bonaparte is come himself – his Army amounts to 80,000 men – if we can unite, we shall I hope do our duty…”, 4 pages, 4to, marked up in pencil, Salamanca, 16 November 1808 [Hook II 211]

130. Gordon (J.W., Colonel, Military Secretary at the Horse Guards) Letter signed, to Baird, expressing the Duke of York’s approbation of his conduct and appointments, 5 pages, folio, Horse Guards, 17 November 1808

131. Pasley (Charles, Captain R.E.) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, an important dispatch (forwarded by Baird to Moore) describing the ill success of General Blake and the Spanish army under General Castanos, which means that Baird can expect no support from that quarter, 11 pages, folio, Astorga, 17 November 1808

132. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, describing a French raid on Valladolid and making further arrangements for their union (“…My wish is, if possible, to assemble the Army between Zamora & this place. I hope the Enemy is not yet prepared to disturb us -- but in coming to me, you must use your discretion, and act upon information you receive of His movements – I shall let you know all I hear…”), 7 pages, 4to, marked up in pencil for publication, Salamanca, 17 November 1808 [Hook II 212-3]

133. Moore (Sir John, General) Letter signed, with long autograph postscript, to Baird, announcing the arrival of funds from England and giving further instructions (“…If you send the Troops to Benevente, whoever commands them, must be vigilant, & ready to fall back upon you – if the French move in that direction – and Astorga must not be left uncovered…”), 4 pages, folio, Salamanca, 18 November 1808

134. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, written in considerable anxiety at not having heard from him, and discussing the situation in which they find themselves (“…I wish to impress upon you that from the singular situation in which I find myself – too near the Enemy, before the Army is untied – and in perfect ignorance of the views of the Spanish – I can form no plans which are not liable to be changed…”), 5 pages, minor contemporary stains, Salamanca, 21 November 1808 [this, rather than a duplicate of 131, as stated by Hook II 217n, appears to have been enclosed with 136 below, not in Hook]

135. Baird (Sir David) Retained autograph copy of a letter to Moore, informing him of Blake’s defeat and outlining his intentions (“…by the 29th I expect to have the greater part of my Infantry, with one Regt of Cavalry, and a Troop of Horse Artillery, in the Neighbourhood, and I should then be able to move with greater confidence and security, if not previously compelled to fall back, by the advance of a superior force of the Enemy:-- Should I at present advance to Benevente, and the French approach, a retreat would become very difficult for Infantry through an open Country, and in face of a powerful Cavalry…”), 7 pages, small 4to, marked up in pencil for publication, Astorga, 21 November 1808 [long extract Hook II 219-20]

136. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, giving him orders to embark at Corunna without him if needs be (“…you should use your entire discretion, in obeying whatever orders I send you – & I shall only feel comfortable, in proportion as I am assured that you will do so. Do not therefore advance a man from Astorga until you think it safe to do so, when your are ready, you will apprize me, and I shall move a corps from this, to Zamora and shall probably go with it myself but if the French, in consequence of Blake’s defeat turn in force against you, we must give up the juncture and you must retreat, and reimbark…”), 6 pages, 4to, Salamanca, 21 November 1808 [Hook II 217-9]

137. Baird (Sir David) Retained autograph draft of a letter to Admiral De Courcy, commanding HM ships at Corunna, ordering him to be ready for his re-embarkation (“…The unfortunate disasters which have attended the Spanish Armies, and the rapid advance of the French Forces having rendered it almost certain that our junction with Sir John Moore will be prevented, and that the British Troops under my Command will be compelled to fall back and reimbark at some port in Galicia. – I have the Honor to request that you will have the goodness to take immediate steps for placing the whole of the transports you can collect, in a situation to receive the Army on board…”), 3 pages, folio, Astorga, 22 November 1808

138. Memorandum of a council of war, signed by Baird and his general and staff officers, including Paget and Craufurd, recording their decision, in accordance with the tenor of Moore’s letters and the discretion granted by him to Baird, that “it appears to the undersigned, that it would be decidedly proper, that the Troops at Astorga, should continue their retreat on Gallicia, as soon as it is ascertained that the Enemy are within Three Days march of the place, in force, or in such a situation as would prevent a junction with Sir John Moore from being affected”, 3 pages, folio, Astorga, 23 November 1808

139. Baird (Sir David) Retained autograph draft of a letter, to Moore, informing him that he and his general officers have decided, under the circumstances, not to advance (“…I confess I am at a loss to discover our object at this Moment in Spain. – That the Spaniards will not be able to collect any Force capable of opposing the progress of the Enemy is very evident…”), 7 pages, small 4to, Astorga, 23 November 1808 [extract Hook II 224-5]

140. Romana (Don Pedro, Marques de la, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, discussing the proposed British retreat, 3 pages, small 4to, Leon, 25 November 1808

141. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, informing him of the latest intelligence regarding French strength, which means that Baird’s retreat may not be necessary (“…I have written my sentiments fully to Government by this Messenger – do not detain him longer than to write your’s, which I believe do not differ much from mine – and the sooner the eyes of the good people of England are opened, the better…”), 4 pages, 4to, Salamanca, 26 November 1808 [Hook II 226-7]

142. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, hoping that he has stopped his retreat (“…Should you be forced, before we join, to retreat – consider whether the Cavalry, could not, under Lord Paget, make a push to join me – and if it be possible let him try it, keeping well to his right…”), 3 pages, folio, Salamanca, 27 November 1808 [Hook II 228-9]

143. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, announcing his intention, following Castanos’s defeat, to abandon the Spanish and retreat into Portugal (“…The French in Spain are estimated at 80,000 men, and 30,000 are expected in the course of a week…I see no chance of our being able to form a junction, as certainly, at Burgos, the French have a Corps which will now move forward. I have therefore determined to retreat upon Portugal – with the Troops I have here – and if possible with Hope’s Corps, if by forced marches he ever joined me --- I wish you to fall back on Corunna – send back immediately your stores under such of your force as you judge proper – you may then stay with the rest a little longer, if you can depend upon knowing the movements of the Enemy…”), 4 pages, 4to, Salamanca, 28 November 1808 (in a postscript Moore states that it was written after 144 below) [Hook II 234-5]

144. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, marked “Secret”, updating him on French movements and expressing his determination, if possible, to unite with Baird (“…I see my situation and that of the Army I command, in as unfavourable a light as you, or any one can do – I have given it my best consideration – I know that you should have landed at Cadiz and I should have met you at Seville, where the Army should have been united, & equipped – But it was ordered otherwise, and it is our business to make every effort to unite here, and to obey our orders, and the wishes of our Country, to aid the Spaniards, as far as lies in our power – it would never do to retreat, without making the attempt – If the Enemy prevent us, there is no help for it – but if he does not, then I am determined to unite the Army. When that is done we shall act according to circumstances – we shall be from 32 to 35,000 Men. There is still a chance that the presence of so large a british force, may give spirits to the Spaniards…”), 7 pages, 4to, marked up in pencil for publication, Salamanca, 28 November 1808 [long extract Hook II 229-30]

145. Moore (Sir John, General) Translation from French into English, by a French scribe, of a secret letter to the Marques de Romana (“…My intention is to unite my army on the line of the Duero, from Zamora, by Toro Tordesillas, under the actual circonstances that the events change from day to day I cannot decide, at this moment the future mouvements. I desire Marquis to open with you the most confidential correspondence…”), 3 pages, 4to, Salamanca, 28 November 1808

146. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, written following his letter of the previous night (143 above) ordering him to retreat (“…I have nothing to add to what I wrote you last night – you will make your retreat concealing your intention as long as you can. I had written to the Marquis of Romana that I should assemble the army and act if possible with him That now is our of the question, tell him, when on the frontier of Portugal I shall be ready to retire, if circumstances render it eligible – or by embarking and going round to another part of Spain – we may be more useful – we by no means abandon the Cause of Spain – but only withdraw from a situation where , without aiding it, we should ourselves be destroyed…”), 3 pages, 4to, Salamanca, 29 November 1808 [Hook II 236]

147. Baird (Sir David) Retained autograph draft, signed, of a letter to Moore, offering a long and detailed analysis of their situation (“…Under these circumstances I am inclined to suggest whether it might not be more advisable that by a flank movement of your Corps the junction should be formed on my right, rather than that I should proceed towards Salamanca, & thus uncover Galicia, and abandon the protection of the Asturias…”), 10 pages, folio, near-contemporary stains and smudges, Astorga, 29 November 1808 [Hook II 231-4]

148. Baird (Sir David) Retained autograph draft of a letter to Admiral De Courcy, ordering him to have every vessel to receive troops either at Corunna or Vigo, 2 pages, 4to, Astorga, 29 November 1808

149. Baird (Sir David) Retained autograph draft, beginning as a far copy, of a letter to Marques de Romana, informing him of Moore’s decision to retreat to Portugal, 2 pages, Astorga, 30 November 1808 [Hook II 237]

150. Romana (Don Pedro, Marques de la, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, entreating him to delay his retreat and warning him of the ruinous consequences for the Spanish cause, 4 pages, 4to, Leon, 30 November 1808 [summary Hook II 239]

151. Baird (Sir David) Retained autograph draft of a letter to de la Romana, agreeing to delay his retreat pending further instructions from Moore, 3 pages, 4to, Astorga, 1 December 1808 [Hook II 239]

152. Romana (Don Pedro, Marques de la, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, pressing upon him the importance of his troops staying in Astorga, 4 pages, 4to, Leon, 2 December 1808

153. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, asking him to send him one regiment of cavalry (“…Bonaparte is at Burgos, probably waiting the arrival of Reinforcements, to move forward in this direction – whether my junction with you could have been accomplished, or not, I know not, it would have been attended with the risk of the destruction of the whole – and if accomplished would have left us to contend single handed with the whole French Army, for the Spaniards are dispersed…”), 5 pages, 4to, Salamanca, 2 December 1808 [Hook II 240-2]

154. Paget (Henry, Lord, Colonel, afterwards Field Marshal and Marquess of Anglesey) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, urging that the cavalry should join up with the main army, beginning: “I wrote to you in haste last night and omitted to offer for your consideration some military reasons, why the junction with Sir John Moore, which I propose to make with the Cavalry, ought certainly to take place…”, 7 pages, 4to, Astorga, 4 December 1808

155. Romana (Don Pedro, Marques de la, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, urging the importance of his joining with “Sir Moore”, 3 pages, 4to, Leon, 4 December 1808

156. Paget (Henry, Lord, Colonel, afterwards Field Marshal and Marquess of Anglesey) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, apologising for not having sent on Moore’s letter “which was to decide the movement of the Cavalry” (“…The only excuse…is that whilst writing to you & to Sir John I had 3 Spanish Officers stunning me with their jargon & Colonel Hamilton & two Commissaries & the Head Muleteer all talking at once. I have with difficulty found the letter amidst a Chaos of Papers…”), 3 pagers, 4to, Astorga, 4 December 1808

157. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, ordering him to return to Astorga (“…I wrote to you last night to suspend your retrograde movement, I now write to you to beg that will put to the right about, and return, bag & baggage, to Astorga – the people of Madrid, it is said, are enthusiastick, & desperate, and certainly, at this moment, do resist the French…I mean to proceed, bridle in hand, for if the bubble bursts, and Madrid falls, we shall have to run for it…”), 5 pages, 4to, Salamanca, 6 December 1808 [Hook II 256-7]

158. Baird (Sir David) Retained draft, with autograph revisions, to a letter to Moore, stating that he has halted the retreat, and suggesting that, instead of his joining Moore at Salamanca, the combined British army cover Galicia and part of Leon, 4 pages, folio, Villa Franca, 8 December 1808

159. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, informing him that Madrid still holds out (“…as long as there is a chance, we must not abandon this Country…”), and discussing future plans for command in the army, 5 pages, 4to, Salamanca, 8 December 1808 [extract with “private communications” omitted Hook II 261]

160. Clinton (Henry, Colonel, Adjutant General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, enclosing a proposed order of battle (see 161 below), 2 pages, 4to, Salamanca, 8 December 1808

161. “Proposed Order of Battle of the Army under the Command of Lieutenant General Sir John Moore K.B.” (enclosed with 160 above), 1 page, oblong 4to, 8 December 1808

162. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, discussing their respective dispositions, following the fall of Madrid (“…Madrid this continues to occupy a part of the French army. Saragossa still holds out, and, they say, they are endeavouring to collect forces in the South. Thus all cannot be directed against us, & we must try our hands…”), 4 pages, 4to, Salamanca, 10 December 1808 [Hook II 262-3]

163. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, discussing their respective dispositions (“…I may move on to Plancencia & Burgos & thus threaten the Enemy’s communications, and cause a diversion in favour of Madrid or Saragossa – or any movement which may be in contemplation from the South of the Tagus. I shall at all events cover you whilst assembling at Astorga & Benevente, and may bring you on to me, fall back upon you, as occasion requires…”), 7 pages, 4to, marked up in pencil for publication, Salamanca, 12 December 1808

164. Moore (Sir John, General) Letter signed, to Baird, describing the sudden change in their march following the famous intercept of a dispatch to Marshal Soult (“…it was intention to have moved to morrow on Valladolid, but a letter from Buonaparte to Marshal Soult, at Saldanha, which we have intercepted, the Officer who carried it having been murdered by the Peasantry, I am induced to change my direction, and shall be tomorrow, with all the Troops I have, at Toro and its immediate neighbourhood; it appears that Marshal Soult, Duc de Dalmatie, has with him two divisions at Saldanha…”) and stating that he now intends uniting the army with Baird at Benevente and himself at Toro (“…It appears from the intercepted Letter, from deserters and from Prisoners we have taken, that the French are in complete ignorance of our present movements, and think we have retreated…”), 4 pages, 4to, Alejos, 14 December 1808 [Hook II271-2]

165. Moore (Sir John, General) Autograph letter signed, to Baird, written shortly before their armies finally met (“…tomorrow I purpose to march to some Villages, which I understand will hold all this Corps, within two or three Leagues of Benevente. I shall then be so near to you as to give perfect security to the assembling of your Corps at that place. I shall then also be able to have the pleasure of meeting you…”), 3 pages, folio, Toro, 16 December 1808 [Hook II 273-4]

166. Autograph letter signed by Charles Abbot, Speaker of the House of Commons, to Baird, sending him the Commons “Resolution of Thanks for the Eminent Services atcheived by Yourself and that Gallant Army of which the Command devolved upon You during the late Memorable Battle of Corunna”, and requesting him to signify the same to Hope, Bentinck and other officers in the army, 2 pages, folio, House of Commons, 25 January 1809

167. Autograph letter signed by Lord Eldon, the Lord Chancellor, transmitting the thanks of the House of Lords “to you, Sir and the Lieutenant Generals, Major Generals & Officers, who served in the Army under the Command of the late Lieutenant General Moore, for distinguished Conduct & exemplary Valour, displayed in the Battle of Corunna, whereby the complete Repulse and signal Defeat of the Enemy on every point of Attack was effected, and the safe & unmolested Embarkation of the Army secured in the presence of a French Army of superior Force” (“…In common with all our Fellow Subjects allow me, Sir, to express an earnest Anxiety for the Restoration of your Health, which, as this House has recorded, has been sacrificed to the Welfare & Interests of the Kingdom…”), 3 pages, 4to, 27 January 1809

168. Intelligence report, in an unidentified hand, on the roads in Leon, 4 pages, folio, paper watermarked 1807

169-178 Letters relating to Baird’s later career, including letters by the Duke of York and Sir Henry Taylor, a retained copy, signed, of Baird’s report on his service as commander of the forces in Ireland (“…The distress for Food, arising principally from a want of means to purchase it, continues to prevail in various districts, and the late Accounts from the South and the West, are of the most afflicting character…”); the final letter being a curt note sent to Baird by the Duke of Wellington in 1828 (“…I assure you that I have not read one word of Sir Walter Scott’s Napoleon excepting the first Volume, or of Col Napier’s book…”)

References

Hook, T.,
The Life of General, the Right Honourable Sir David Baird, Bart., G.C.B., K.C. & c. (London, 1833)