A Collection of Gallantry Awards to the Lincolnshire Regiment

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Date of Auction: 17th July 2019

Sold for £1,900

Estimate: £700 - £900

A Great War M.M. and Second Award Bar group of four awarded to Lance Corporal C. S. Gill, 1/5th Battalion (Territorial Force), Lincolnshire Regiment, who died of wounds in France on 15 October 1918

Military Medal G.V.R., with Second Award Bar (240913 L. Cpl. C. S. Gill. 1/5 Linc: R. – T.F.); 1914-15 Star (3625 Pte. C. S. Gill. Linc: R.); British War and Victory Medals (3625 Cpl. C. S. Gill. Linc. R.) good very fine (4) £700-£900

Footnote

M.M. London Gazette 18 June 1917.

The Recommendation states: ‘Whilst in charge of a stretcher party he continually exposed himself to heavy fire, whilst attending to the wounded and showed great coolness and resource in his skilful handling of his Section in bringing in wounded from the line to the Aid Post by the best route in the shortest possible time.’

M.M. Second Award Bar London Gazette 17 September 1917.

The Recommendation states: ‘For outstanding work being a stretcher bearer under heavy fire in the open.’

Charles Samuel Gill was born at Scartho, Lincolnshire, in 1895, the son of George and Maria Gill. He enlisted in the 1/5th Battalion (Territorial Force), Lincolnshire Regiment at Grimsby in January 1915 and arrived in France on 17 August 1915.
He received the M.M. for gallantry with the 5th Battalion between 19 April and 23 April 1917 near Lens as described in the 5th Battalion History by Lieutenant-Colonel T. E. Sandall:
‘The Military Medal was also awarded to Lance-Corporal C. Gill, who was in charge of the stretcher bearers during this period; he continually exposed himself to heavy fire, while attending to wounded, and showed great coolness and resource in his skilful handling of his section in bringing in wounded from the line to the Aid Post by the best route in the shortest possible time.’


He was awarded a bar to his M.M. for his gallantry on 1 July 1917 during the attack on the Cite de Moulin. Sandall again documents the circumstances of the award:
‘The stretcher-bearers also did very good work under heavy fire in the open, especially Privates F. Norton, E. Conroy, and Lance-Corporal C. S. Gill.’


Lance Corporal Gill died of wounds at No. 3 Stationary Hospital, Rouen, on 15 October 1918 and is buried at St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen, France.