The Jack Webb Collection of Medals and Militaria

To be Sold on: 20th August 2020

Estimate: £3,000 - £4,000

56th (West Essex) Regiment, Officer’s Gorget c.1785-97.
A magnificent and most rare ‘stepped’ pattern example in silver coloured metal, correctly constructed on a wire frame, the central area engraved with the Royal Arms of Great Britain pre 1801, above this ‘Gibraltar’ surmounted by the Castle & Key. In the upper left area a festoon holding a laurel wreath enclosing ’56’, in the upper right the same decoration enclosing ‘Regt.’, maximum width 106mm, height 113mm,
excellent condition £3,000-£4,000

Do you know someone who may be interested in this lot? Let them know by entering their name and email address below and pressing 'Tell a Friend'. You can preview the message before it is sent on the next page.

Our experts are available to answer any questions you may have regarding this lot. If you would like to ask a question, please enter it below and click 'Ask an Expert':

If you would like to see additional detail for this lot then you can request this using the form below.

Any reasonable requested additional images will be added to the lot description and you will be sent an email informing you that they are now available.

 
56th (West Essex) Regiment, Officer’s Gorget c.1785-97.
A magnificent and most rare ‘stepped’ pattern example in silver coloured metal, correctly constructed on a wire frame, the central area engraved with the Royal Arms of Great Britain pre 1801, above this ‘Gibraltar’ surmounted by the Castle & Key. In the upper left area a festoon holding a laurel wreath enclosing ’56’, in the upper right the same decoration enclosing ‘Regt.’, maximum width 106mm, height 113mm,
excellent condition £3,000-£4,000
The honour ‘Gibraltar’ was awarded to the 12th (East Suffolk) Regiment, 39th (Dorsetshire) Regiment, 56th (West Essex) Regiment & the 58th (Rutland) Regiment in April 1784 following the stout defence of the fortress and harbour, it was assumed that the Castle & Key insignia were also included. As a result officers’ shoulder belt plates of the period, of which two are known (39th & 58th Regiments) and here a gorget incorporated this distinction. Horse Guards refused to permit this usage and ordered the four regiments to take down any such instances. Not until the 1830’s was the insignia finally awarded to the four regiments.