Orders, Decorations, Medals and Militaria

To be Sold on: 13th January 2021

Estimate: £1,400 - £1,800

Sold for: £3,000

A Second War ‘Tempest pilot’s’ D.F.C. group of five awarded to Flight Lieutenant G. W. Dopson, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, who shot down a Fw. 190 over Rheims on 27 August 1944 and an Me. 109 over Dorsten on 28 March 1945, and shared in the destruction of a Ju. 188 over Osnabruck on 31 March 1945

Distinguished Flying Cross, G.VI.R., the reverse officially dated ‘1945’; 1939-45 Star; Air Crew Europe Star, 1 clasp, France and Germany; War Medal 1939-45; Air Efficiency Award, E.II.R. (Flt. Lt. G. W. Dopson, R.A.F.V.R.) nearly extremely fine (5) £1,400-£1,800

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A Second War ‘Tempest pilot’s’ D.F.C. group of five awarded to Flight Lieutenant G. W. Dopson, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, who shot down a Fw. 190 over Rheims on 27 August 1944 and an Me. 109 over Dorsten on 28 March 1945, and shared in the destruction of a Ju. 188 over Osnabruck on 31 March 1945

Distinguished Flying Cross, G.VI.R., the reverse officially dated ‘1945’; 1939-45 Star; Air Crew Europe Star, 1 clasp, France and Germany; War Medal 1939-45; Air Efficiency Award, E.II.R. (Flt. Lt. G. W. Dopson, R.A.F.V.R.) nearly extremely fine (5) £1,400-£1,800
D.F.C. London Gazette 1 June 1945.

The original recommendation states: ‘This Warrant Officer joined the Squadron in October 1944. His timely arrival marked the commencement of a long series of offensive operations flown deep into Germany and consisting of armed reconnaissances and fighter sweeps. In such spheres, W./O. Dopson has proved to be a worthy contributor to the ever increasing total of successes by attacking 22 locomotives, several barges, motor transports and miscellaneous targets. To these claims he has added the destruction of an Fw. 190 and damaged another enemy fighter. His figure of operational hours has been achieved with constant keenness, initiative and offensive spirit. He has always pressed home his attacks with a fearless determination and complete disregard for his own personal safety.’

Geoffrey William Dopson commenced operational flying with 80 Squadron as a Warrant Officer in October 1944, soon after the unit had converted to Tempests and, by the time of his recommendation for the D.F.C., dated 10 March 1945, had flown 74 operational sorties. Of his air-to-air successes, official records reveal his destruction of an Fw. 190 five miles north-west of Rheims on 27 August 1944 and an Me. 109 over Dorsten, on 28 March 1945. Of this latter engagement his combat report states:
‘When in the Dorsten area two Me. 109s flew across our nose in a south easterly direction. I turned onto the starboard Hun closing from line astern and fired one 3-second burst from 150 yards closing to 50 yards from which I obtained several strikes on the under aide of the fuselage and just behind the cowling and also on the port wing root. A stream of whitish smoke was emitted, several pieces flew off the port wing and as the aircraft went into a gentle climb, the cockpit hood was jettisoned. I broke away just as the Hun entered cloud.’


On the last day of March 1945, and having been commissioned as Pilot Officer, Dopson shared in the destruction of a Ju. 188 seven miles north-east of Osnabruck:
‘I approached from line astern and fired one 4-second burst from 800 yards closing rapidly to within 50 yards, when I was forced to break violently to avoid collision. The E./A. was then in a gentle turn to port and on looking back I could see the port engine smoking and later catch fire.’ (combat report refers).


Dopson was awarded his Air Efficiency Award on 19 January 1956.

Sold with copied combat reports and other research.